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(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.U.S. Navy bans soldiers from using e-cigarettes for safety reasons(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.

(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.U.S. Navy bans soldiers from using e-cigarettes for safety reasons(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.

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(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.U.S. Navy bans soldiers from using e-cigarettes for safety reasons(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.U.S. Navy bans soldiers from using e-cigarettes for safety reasons

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U.S. Navy bans soldiers from using e-cigarettes for safety reasons(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.U.S. Navy bans soldiers from using e-cigarettes for safety reasons(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.

(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.U.S. Navy bans soldiers from using e-cigarettes for safety reasons(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.(Navy Times)-Sailors vaping ships and bases may soon become a thing of the past. The string of incidents since last year has prompted naval security officials to recommend that e-cigarette lights be out of the entire fleet. E-cigarettes are liquids that heat up nicotine and are delivered to users as battery-powered devices for flavored vapors. In the August 11 memo, the Naval Security Center鈥檚 detailed growing safety concerns exploded in 2015 and the battery in the device has caused more than a dozen people to be injured. When lithium-ion batteries overheat, the memo says that the seal around them may fail and open an electronic cigarette to a small bomb. "The Naval Security Center concluded that these devices pose a significant and unacceptable risk to naval personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, ships, and aircraft." The memorandum reads and will soon put forward a proposal on naval property products. Complete prohibition. The report states that although laptops and cell phones also run on lithium-ion batteries, extensive testing has shown that they are not prone to explode when they fail. The Navy is making suggestions that this will ultimately have to be achieved by the Fleet Forces Command and the US Pacific Fleet, which is ugly. "Leaders are reviewing the Naval Security Center's recommendations on e-cigarettes and weighing the risks related to safety and health of both parties," said Navy spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Marycate Walsh. The security center recorded incidents from October to May 12, and allowed unreported, possibly more incidents. There are no incidents recorded before October 2015, the memo said. The seventh incident occurred on a warship and at least two need to use fire-fighting equipment on board to extinguish the fire. The eighth incident occurred, and the e-cigarette was a sailor's pocket, causing first- and second-degree burns. Two sailors had their electronic cigarette exploded in their mouths, causing injuries to their faces and teeth. The report said that all in all, e-cigarettes have led to more than 150 days of tariff reduction for sailors who were hospitalized for three days. The Naval Maritime System Command has issued a partial ban on lithium-ion batteries at the reporting center. The Security Center recommended that this ban be extended to e-cigarettes. "It is strongly recommended to take action to prohibit the use, transportation or storage of these equipment in naval facilities, submarines, ships, ships and aircraft," the memo read. "Along with these efforts, it is recommended that the Navy launch a dedicated safety campaign to learn from service personnel about the potential dangers of these products. "The problem of exploding electronic cigarettes is not limited to the Navy. The report points out that the damage and breakdown statistics from the civilian sector track what the Navy is worth in its data.